Misleading behavior within Intel's technology allows a local attacker to compromise and take control of work laptops.

Imagine someone having the capability to remotely access and operate your laptop at their whim, without you being able to do anything about it. Pretty scary thought, right? Luckily this couldn’t really happen – magic hacker tricks capable of bypassing strong passwords, firewalls and anti-malware software only exist in the movies.

It’s just that sometimes reality kicks fiction right in the teeth. In July 2017 Harry Sintonen, one of F-Secure’s Senior Security Consultants, discovered unsafe and misleading default behaviour within Intel’s Active Management Technology (AMT). AMT is Intel’s proprietary solution for remote access monitoring and maintenance of corporate-grade personal computers, created to allow IT departments or managed service providers to better control their device fleets.
NASA’s $US1 billion Juno spacecraft completed its 10th high-speed trip around Jupiter on December 16.

The robot gets relatively close to the gas giant planet and takes new photos with its JunoCam instrument roughly every 53 days, while travelling at speeds up to 130,000 mph.

It can take days or sometimes weeks to receive the images, but the wait is worth it. The latest batch of photos features countless swirling, hallucinatory clouds and storms.

Researchers at NASA and the Southwest Research Institute uploaded the raw image data to their websites in late December. Since then, dozens of people have processed the black-and-white files into gorgeous, calendar-ready colour pictures.
It’s a little-known twist in the cyber-warfare between nations that carries potentially devastating consequences. At a time when more than 95% of everything that moves on the global Internet passes through just 200 undersea fiber-optic cables, potential adversaries such as the US, Russia, China and Iran are focusing on these deep-sea information pipes as rich sources of intelligence as well as targets in war.

The weapons earmarked for the struggle include submarines, underwater drones, robots and specialized ships and divers. The new battlefield is also a gray legal zone: Current Law of the Sea conventions cover some aspects of undersea cables but not hostile acts.
Security researchers have unearthed multiple vulnerabilities in hundreds of GPS services that could enable attackers to expose a whole host of sensitive data on millions of online location tracking devices managed by vulnerable GPS services.

The series of vulnerabilities discovered by two security researchers, Vangelis Stykas and Michael Gruhn, who dubbed the bugs as 'Trackmageddon' in a report, detailing the key security issues they have encountered in many GPS tracking services.

Trackmageddon affects several GPS services that harvest geolocation data of users from a range of smart GPS-enabled devices, including children trackers, car trackers, pet trackers among others, in an effort to enable their owners to keep track of where they are.
The first therapeutic virus to pass the blood-brain barrier.

A study attempting to show that viruses could be delivered to brain tumours has delivered that and more.

Not only did the virus in question reach its target, it also stimulated the patient's own immune system - which then also attacked the tumour.

Preclinical experiments in mice, followed by window-of-opportunity trials in nine human patients, showed that the naturally occurring virus offers potential for a new type of cancer therapy that could be used alongside other treatments.
Wishing you all a very 'belated' Merry Christmas. This holiday season Santa has a very special gift for all PlayStation gamers.

Developer SpecterDev finally released a fully-functional much-awaited kernel exploit for PlayStation 4 (firmware 4.05) today—almost two months after Team Fail0verflow revealed the technical details of it.
Now available on Github, dubbed "namedobj," the kernel exploit for the PlayStation 4 on 4.05FW allows users to run arbitrary code on the gaming console, enabling jailbreaking and kernel-level modifications to the system.
The Shape of Water director Guillermo del Toro recently spoke to The Hollywood Reporter about some of the strangest and most supernatural experiences of his life. In addition to two encounters with ghosts, he describes how he had a very vivid encounter with a UFO as a young man — and it looked like crap.

“You sound like a complete lunatic, but I saw a UFO. I didn't want to see a UFO,” says del Toro. “It was horribly designed.” He described buying a six-pack — which he insists he didn’t drink! — with a friend, and the pair drove out to go look at the stars on the side of an isolated freeway near Guadalajara.